Skip to content

Mi Shivajiraje Bhosale Boltoy Movie Review

April 19, 2009

Mee Shivajiraje Bhosale Boltoy (It’s me, Shivajiraje Bhosale speaking) is a blockbuster! Released early this month, this Marathi film, written by Mahesh Manjrekar of Astitva fame, and directed by Santosh Manjrekar is running to packed houses.

I liked it. It’s entertaining. It has a message. Rather, many messages. And it’s not a hate movie, far from it. It’s a movie that handles the subject of “outsiders” in Maharashtra in the most sensitive way possible and entertains you in the bargain.

The story is about an ordinary, laid back middle class middle aged Maharashtrian man by the name of Dinkar Bhosale (Sachin Khedekar). Everywhere he goes he finds that “outsiders” are prospering. Whether it’s the man from the south who is running a successful restaurant the man from the north who is a builder, they have all the money and all the status and the power. Maharashtrians are nowhere. And as for Bhosle, he is just a clerk in a bank. His son Rahul (Abhijeet Kelkar) cannot get admission in engineering college because he lacks the lakhs for the capitation fee, and his daughter Shashikala (Priya Bapat) cannot get a film role because she is not “north Indian” enough. Bhosle’s daily life consists of receiving taunts and insults not just at work (his character reminded me of Jim Carrey’s from The Mask) and from waiters and vegetable vendors but also from his own wife Sumitra (Suchira Bandekar). This is driving him over the edge and has started to make him hate his Maharashtrian “Ghati” identity. Dinkar Bhosle is angry, very angry, and blames the “outsiders” who have settled in Maharashtra. They, Bhosle feels, are responsible for his own sorry state.

But enter Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj, (Mahesh Manjrekar) the brave king who successfully fought off foreign invaders in his lifetime (1664 – 1680) and Bhosale’s life transforms! No one can see Shivaji, except Bhosale. The same kind technique that one saw in Munnabhai Lage Raho, where Mahatma Gandhi comes to the aid of Munna. However Me Shivaji Rao Bhosale is a serious movie, not a comedy like MLR, although it does have its funny moments. Shivaji can be taken to represent Bhosale’s conscience, his inner strength, his pride in himself. Shivaji wakes Dinkar Bhosle out of his lethargy and tells him to take responsibility for his life.

Shivaji reminds Bhosale of the great legacy of Maharashtra, of the great leaders past and tells him that if Maharashtrians are being sidelined then it is because they deserve it. The Marathi manoos has become lazy and defeatist. Instead of blaming others he needs to wake up, show some courage, take some risks, get off his ass. Quite different from the MNS ideology which wants to hand over jobs to Maharashtrians on a platter!

Shivaji tells Dinkar Bhosale that he needs to fix things himself just once, but throughout the movie Dinkar Bhosale  does things himself to improve his lot (with Shivaji simply guiding him). The rest of the message is delivered through the action.

Also, this movie refers to anybody who has been born and brought up in Maharashtra and speaks Marathi as a Maharashtrian, whether he is from UP or Tamil Nadu, whether he is Muslim or Hindu.

Besides the outsider issue, the movie tackles the dangerous virus that has gripped Maharashtra – the corruption in government departments and in politics. Maharashtrians fill these office and it is the Maharashtrians who are shown to have become corrupt. Bhosle, with Shivaji guiding him, tries to waken their pride in themselves, their dignity and self-respect.

Yes, the movie is jingoistic, and moralises a little too much. And the messages are hammered in till you can take it no more! But well, I think this is one movie that is needed. The spectre of Shivaji works.

The movie is entertaining in typical Bollywood ishtyle, with larger than life heroes and villains, the stereotyping of women, the inevitable bloody fight scene tagged in at the end, song and dance, and some emotional verbiage. Overall though the movie is a feel-good movie, and not just for Maharashtrians. It doesn’t denigrate any community. If anything it makes fun of the typical middle class Marathi manoos, a man who is afraid to speak his language, ashamed of his surname, afraid to speak up, and afraid to take any risks to better himself. He is simply a stubborn man not willing to look beyond his nose and is therefore unable to compete and succeed.

This movie is a must-see not just for every Maharashtrian but also for anyone living in Maharashtra. It’s not a piece of cinematic art, but it’s good fun! A social film packed in commercial wrapping paper.

(Photo credits: msrb2.com)

Related Reading: Other Movie Reviews

About these ads
123 Comments leave one →
  1. Mira permalink
    April 19, 2009 8:15 pm

    Hi Nita. Came across your blogpost by chance. I have seen this movie too and liked it. I wish it had been dubbed in other languages because this movie is worth it. I think it should be released all over India because it talks of issues such as corruption, about heritage and also about the importance of having clean politicians. It’s the kind of movie to inspire the masses.

    Mira, I am not sure whether people across the country will be able to relate to it, because it is so much about Maharashtra and Shivaji! But anyone who is a little familiar with MH will be able to. – Nita.

  2. April 19, 2009 8:23 pm

    Nita:

    When I did a film meme recently, I mentioned a film ‘Yehi Hai Zindagi’ which Prerna remembered but even Dev hadn’t seen. It featured Sanjeev Kumar who seems to discuss his problems with Krishna, who appears only to him, of course.

    I see with MLR and now MSBB, the formula seems to have gained ground and serves a dual purpose: guidance in a crisis by a higher power somewhat in a ‘What would … do?’ manner as well as a message of self-empowerment.

    This film sounds interesting but as usual, I shall wait for the DVD. I just add them to my DVD queue and wait. :-/

    Shefaly, I have not seen “Yehi Hai Zindagi’ and in any case I am sure that this technique is an oft used technique, used a great deal in western cinema as well. I primarily see this particular film as a social film thought and a part history lesson! – Nita.

    • April 20, 2009 1:59 am

      Shefaly, you speak Marathi ?

      • April 20, 2009 2:41 am

        I don’t speak it any more but I can read and understand most of it without needing subtitles or a dictionary.

  3. April 19, 2009 8:33 pm

    DVD with sub-titles available?

    I don’t think anything with english subtitles is availabe RK. Not yet. – Nita.

  4. April 19, 2009 10:04 pm

    I would like to see the movie if it is available with subtitles.

    Somehow I think you won’t like this movie Amit! :) It’s a little in your face,if you know what I mean. – Nita.

  5. April 19, 2009 10:48 pm

    Interesting. Mahesh Manjrekar has not disappointed me far. Hope it stays that way.

    This is just in time for my parents to get the DVD :) Nita, are there any other good Marathi movies / plays that you recommend? I always ask Aai-Baba to pick some up when they visit; it’d be nice to know a few on your list.

    Thanks!
    g

    gauri, I think shwaas is one that is a must-see but I need to research more before I can give you a list! Hopefully if Mahendra comes to this post he will give a few suggestions as he knows a lot about Marathi cinema. – Nita.

    • April 20, 2009 8:45 am

      Nita, you’ve put me in a spot! :-)

      I had reviewed Shwaas briefly earlier. Some others, off the cuff:

      MUST SEE

      – Shantata Court Chalu Aahe – absolutely must see. I’m not aware of availability.
      – Umbartha – not sure, but VCD should be available
      – 22 June 1897 (VCD available)
      – Dhyasparva (VCD available)
      – Natasamraat (Play), with Dr. Lagoo (VCD available)

      Recommended

      – Shyaamchi Aai*
      – Ghashiram Kotwal*
      – Sinhasan
      – Kalat Nakalat (I’d written about interpreting ‘Mana Tuzhe Manogata’ composition)
      – Ek Zunja Vaaryaashi
      – Me Nathuram Godse Boltoy (play) and Gandhi Viruddha Gandhi (play)

      * haven’t yet seen myself.

      To generalize, anything involving Vijay Tendulkar and Dilip Prabhawalkar is a safe bet. Most of Amol Palekar too.

      • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
        April 20, 2009 11:28 am

        Nita,

        I am pleasantly surprised by your list of “must see” and “recommended” Marathi films. To these I would add (in the MUST SEE list) Prabhat’s classics Kunku (1937), Manoos (1939) and Shejaari. Kunku, in particular, comes across as being refreshingly modern even sixty-plus years down the line.

        Permit me to add that, in the best tradition of the Prabhat Film Company — and also of other prominent film “madrasi” companies of those days, based in Kolkata and Chennai — these were simultaneously made (not just dubbed or subtitled) in Hindi, with some roles being played by different actors than in the ORIGINAL “madrasi” version. But because of the tendency, among both film historians and internet sites, to give to Hindi the credit for anything good done in Marathi films (e.g. Astitva, which you have mentioned) IREFUSE to volunteer the titles of the Hindi versions. Those who are interested MUST be made to struggle to find them on their own, or have them aggressively rammed down their throats.

        To your list I would also add Anaahat, Pinjaraa and Chaani, which I exclude from my harangue above as their being Marathi is generally acknowledged.

        I have not dealt with the pre-Prabhat classics, for which I would have to look up secondary sources.

        Vivek, I think the credit should go to Mahendra. :) – Nita

        • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
          April 20, 2009 11:30 am

          A small correction in the first paragraph above, about Kunku. That should read “seventy-plus” not “sixty-plus”.

        • April 20, 2009 1:15 pm

          Vivek

          One of my close friends, with whom you have engaged in conversation on my blog at times, is from the Kulkarni family which financed Prabhat Film Company. His mama, the third generation, is still involved with the company I believe.

          Just thought it will amuse you. :-)

          • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
            April 20, 2009 7:22 pm

            Shefaly:

            I am more than amused. I am positively interested. If s/he does not mind, could you share the name and e-mail ID? Would the surname of the mama be Damle, by any chance?

            • April 20, 2009 7:37 pm

              Vivek

              I will ask him. I don’t think his mamas go by the surname Damle.

        • April 20, 2009 8:22 pm

          Thanks so much Nita, Mahendra & Vivek. I have seen all the ones above other than Anaheet and Ek Zunza Varyashi – and have a bunch of them here. I’d even add Saadhi Manse, Vazir, Sarkarnama, Tu tithe Mi, Uttarayan, Surya Pahilela Manoos (naatak)…

          Sorry, I should have been more specific – I was looking for good movies that have come up in the past couple years, like Saavlee, Not only Mrs. Raut, Savarkhed Ek Gaav. Or good plays (non-“comedies”).

          Those are very nice titles you mentioned. On another note, does anything from experimental theater ever come out on DVDs? When Amruta Subhash / Nikhil Ratnaparkhi & co. were just emerging, they’d have these little experimental plays in small “halls” with just 30ish people in the audience. Sathe cha Kay karaycha, Mitradvay – Arthat Sangeet Satva Pariksha, etc. I don’t know if those plays made it to bigger stage later, but those were some of the good ones.

          Thanks again, you guys!

          g

      • April 20, 2009 1:16 pm

        Mahendra

        I was a child younger than 10 when I saw a stage production of Shantataa Court Chaloo Aahe in the city of my birth. :-) Stranger things have happened I think.

        • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
          April 20, 2009 7:48 pm

          Shefaly:

          That’s amazing indeed! It is precocious for someone in just the first decile (of age measured in solar years) to see — of all things — Shaantataa Korta Caloo Aahe. Did you sit right through it? :-)

          • April 20, 2009 8:12 pm

            Vivek:

            I did. If I asked the right questions, I was never denied an explanation of things I did not understand right away. So, yes, precocious is an appropriate word here :-/

            Having lived in many places, I am glad now to be based in London where the cultural opportunities on offer rival those in my city of birth. :-)

            • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
              April 20, 2009 10:25 pm

              Shefaly:

              Very happy to see the verb ‘rival’ rather than the more boringly predictable ‘outstrip’ or ‘exceed’. The advantage of small towns and small cities is that more or less all things ‘cultural’ on offer are easily accessible to all, and promise rich opportunities of acculturation and education. Not so the megalopoles with their vast spreads of alienating spaces. You need to have grown up in a diversity of environments to be able to perceive and grasp the best of the big city.

        • April 21, 2009 8:56 am

          Wow! And all these years, I considered myself lucky to have seen the film version on screen…:-(

      • April 20, 2009 1:43 pm

        I guess the movie “Matichya Chuli” is one of the good movies and can be listed in “must see” category.

      • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
        April 20, 2009 7:38 pm

        Mahendra:

        Sorry, I gave the credit to the wrong person, but please be assured it was not done in the spirit of those who give honourable mentions to the Hindi versions of actually Marathi films (especially when the films in question have won some kind of acclaim).

        • April 21, 2009 8:57 am

          Vivek: No issues! I was already fully assured it was not done in that spirit, after your (justified) diatribe above! :-)

    • April 20, 2009 8:49 am

      Here are two links from where you can choose which films to see based on your tastes – period/cast/genre/awards/etc.:

      Wikipedia on Marathi Cinema

      List of few landmark films

  6. April 19, 2009 11:11 pm

    Hmmm…. Nita, I’ve always thought of marathi theatre as something to watch out for…

    Both as a cinema lover and as a person sensitive to such issues that do harm to our nation, I would love if the movie could be made available with sub-titles (would prefer it to a meaninglessly-dubbed version) But more than that I would like to see more of such well meaning cinema be made (and communicated !)

    vaibhav

    yeah you are right, a dubbed version would lose the flavour of the movie. Hopefull the success of the movie prompts Manjrekar to release a DVD with sub-titles. – Nita.

  7. April 19, 2009 11:51 pm

    @ Nita : Hmmmmm but blaming outsiders is so much easier!

  8. April 19, 2009 11:58 pm

    Nita, how come an Indian from UP, Tamilnadu or Bihar is an ‘outsider’ in Msharashtra which itself resides in India??

    What’s ur view on this Marathi manoos vs so-called outsiders issue?? Do u support it??

    No, I do not support the outsider issue. Whether it’s in our own country or when it comes to immigrants to foreign countries. I do sympathise with the poor but the movie articulated my thoughts pretty well. I have a simple philosophy. May the best man win. :) – Nita.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 20, 2009 10:34 pm

      Nita:

      “May the best man win”: a very mediaeval and chivalrous-sounding expression.

      Have you ever wondered about the realpolitik of how the “best man” manoeuvres and manipulates himself into that position? I know a lot of management is about amoral manipulation, but very often the dividing line between the amoral and the immoral becomes very blurred, don’t you think.

      When I said best man surely you didn’t think I meant anything else but someone who was hardworking and capable. When there are two teams in cricket for example, I say may the best team win and this means the more capable team. If someone cheats and wins, then I don’t see how you can call this the best team. – Nita.

      • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
        April 21, 2009 8:54 am

        Bringing in the cricket analogy only reinforces what I call mediaeval and chivalrous-sounding. You know, as well as I do, that real life is not cricket. Please recall our dialogue about retail chains displacing small businesses. Then you said “so be it”, which translates into more or less the same thing as “may the best man win”.

        There is nothing as immoral as crushing the opposition by devious means to protect one’s own position. That’s what a lot of “may the best man win” is about.

  9. Vivek Khadpekar permalink
    April 20, 2009 12:55 am

    Nita,

    Your link to Astitva leads to one of the several sites that mischievously omit to mention that it is primarily a Marathi movie which was (in the old Prabhat tradition) simultaneously and not subsequently made in Hindi. The link you have provided does mention towards the end that it won “2001 : National Film Award for Best Feature Film in Marathi for Mahesh Manjrekar”. But this is in an almost grudging tone.

    Also, I am not really concerned with what the movie says, but it would be nice to insert boldface type as shown here: “…anybody who … speaks Marathi as a Maharashtrian…”. It does not matter where one was born and/or brought up, and what linguistic stock they originally belong to. If they want to claim Maharashtra for themselves they MUST speak and read Marathi.

    Vivek, in the wiki anyone, including you, can make the correction, by providing a link to back up your statement. I hope you do make the correction! – Nita.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 20, 2009 12:59 am

      Postscript: My second paragraph above refers to your present post — the paragraph beginning “Also this movie…”

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 20, 2009 6:57 am

      Nita,

      As I clarified in my postscript, the amendment I am suggesting is not in the wiki about Astitva but in a paragraph of your post.

      I don’t understand Vivek. I have not written about Astitva, but simply given a link to the those who want to know more about the movie. – Nita.

    • April 20, 2009 10:33 am

      Vivek, I read your comment again and realised that you want me to make a change in my post. I think I was answering comments a bit early in the morning and therefor missed your point. Anyway, about your suggestion, I think being subtle works better. :) This particular message in the movie is subtle too…because I think some things if they are hammered in don’t work! :) Manjrekar is a clever one!

  10. April 20, 2009 2:06 am

    Nita, it would be nice if you reviewed more Marathi movies here. Or just do a post on Marathi cinema in general. Plenty of good movies have been made recently in particular Shwaas.

    As for the issues the movie raises, I think making learning Marathi more fun by screening such movies and introducing Marathi literature in school (instead of the textbooks we have right now) will go a long way in making assimilation easy.

    Vikram, yeah Shwaas was a good movie. And if it is a popular or a good movie, yeah I would definitely review a marathi movie. They say marathi cinema is reviving. Lets see. – Nita.

  11. April 20, 2009 8:57 am

    Nita, thanks for the review. I’ve been planning to watch this one, my daughter-permitting! :-)

    And thanks for alerting me to the negatives…if I get to see it, I’ll brace myself and be prepared for the hammering!

    • April 20, 2009 10:26 am

      Mahendra, I can’t thank you enough!! Many many thanks just the same for taking the trouble to do this! You know far more than I do. And I did pick up a copy of Umbartha a few months back. The movie is an excellent one, though a bit depressing.

  12. sraboneyghose permalink
    April 20, 2009 9:03 am

    Didn’t MNS have a problem with this movie?

    • April 20, 2009 10:27 am

      sraboneyghose, I think Manjrekar was very subtle when it came to the initial lecture by Shivaji and the rest of the movie is how the main character Dinkar Bhosale acts it all out and the other lecturing is about other issues, like corruption etc.

  13. April 20, 2009 9:40 am

    this movie was released in Ahmedabad too, but nobody from my family was interested to go (they don’t understand Marathi!) so i too missed it! Thanks for the review, atleast i got a glimpse of it! :)

    Without subtitles this movie is of no use. I saw Sivaji the Boss in Tamil without understanding a word of Tamil, and enjoyed it, but this movie cannot be seen that way. There is too much dialogue and important dialogue. The songs too talk of incidents from Shivaji’s life. – Nita.

  14. April 20, 2009 10:19 am

    Is there a copy with subtitles?

    not yet vishesh! – Nita

  15. Aditi permalink
    April 20, 2009 11:54 am

    “…if Maharashtrians are being sidelined then it is because they deserve it. The Marathi manoos has become lazy and defeatist. Instead of blaming others he needs to wake up, show some courage, take some risks, get off his ass.”

    I felt that this was an important message in the movie, though the movie itself was too long (2 and a half hours). Although it aimed to be a satire-comedy, it fell flat on a lot of points. In the last scene, the use of a sword to kill the ‘evil builder’ was a bit too much.

  16. April 20, 2009 1:59 pm

    Oi. I thought I will get credit for asking you to review this movie in a comment somewhere :D Alas, :D
    I am happy you liked the movie. And the best thing in the movie is the “Powada”. When it reached the last line I was literally shivering with excitement and my eyes damp with proud. The shout of “Jay Bhavani, Jay Shivaji” just came out automatically from nearly everyone in theater. Watching movie with right crowd is always good :D

    Looks like the message is really reaching to people. Not that I have seen much difference in anyone who has seen the movie but still I feel it in them. ;)

    The technical side of movie is also very good. The special effects and lighting is just perfect. I loved the entry scene of Raje and end scene of the movie- the Pratapgad….

    • April 20, 2009 2:40 pm

      Suda, when I was writing the review I thought of your comment and even thought of linking it! But it was Sunday and I was too lazy. :) However, I was planning to review it for a while anyway but had not got the company to go and see it with! But your comment did remind me that I had to see it quickly! :)
      And in the movie I was emotionally affected too and I never thought I would be! And I think the message has reached people because the other day at the mall I spoke in Marathi at the counter and the chap actually replied in Marathi! Otherwise usually these counter people have a huge inferiority complex and always reply to me in Hindi even if I speak in Marathi. And I am talking of those whose mother tongue is Marathi. Still, I haven’t figured out their psychology but after the seeing the movie I think I know what they are feeling. They feel ashamed to speak their language and speaking Hindi makes them feel more literate! It’s the same reason why someone will try and speak English even if he is not that comfortable in it, to show that they know the language!

  17. rags permalink
    April 20, 2009 3:18 pm

    You are a brave person nita….. You sat through three hours of Sivaji the boss (the tamil movie)….. Seeing that movie was pure torture for me. Or maybe it was more tolerable for you because you didn’t understand the langauge ; )

    The outsider issue isn’t restricted to Maharashtra. That attitude is there pretty much all over India . A couple of my friends who had gone to Delhi and knew only a smattering of Hindi had a tough time there… They were not only made to feel like outsiders but also un-Indian,alien and anti-national (because you see Hindi is the “national” language, dunno when people will ever understand the difference). I think that’s worse than being made to feel like an ‘outsider’ from another state. Learning the language when you go to a place is the best solution.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 20, 2009 7:28 pm

      rags:

      //The outsider issue isn’t restricted to Maharashtra//

      Thanks for iterating a very fundamental truth about modern India.

  18. April 20, 2009 3:26 pm

    nice review..would the film come out in Hindi??

  19. April 20, 2009 5:31 pm

    Nita, I am sure North Indians can relate to it. we have all read about Shivaji in our History books. Shivaji has a very important role in Indian History and we all need to be proud of him, not just Marathis. I hope the DVD of the movie is released with English subtitles, I would love to watch it.

  20. April 20, 2009 8:53 pm

    Oh sounds like a Real nice Movie.Hope it has English Subtitles or something.

    Thanks for letting us know.

  21. Dnyanesh permalink
    April 21, 2009 1:45 am

    I haven’t seen this movie yet. But I do agree that Maharashtrians should work hard and take more risks like any other state people. I do not agree that all middle class Maharashtrians have laid back attitude and they do not want to do business. Typically immigrants or migrants work harder and take more risks than local people. Because it is necessary for their survival. You find all kinds of people; lazy, hardworking, risk taking in all communities. There are many examples of Marathi people who made it big starting from very poor background. It is very sad that Manjarekar wants to label all middle class Maharashtrians as lazy and less competant.
    We do have problem of ‘outsiders’ in Maharashtra like in many states. I do not support MNS way but agree that this problem must be taken care of. The solution is NOT driving these poor migrants out of Maharashtra but improving standard of living in Bihar, UP by creating jobs and wealth there so these poor people will go back by choice. Can Bihar, UP citizens choose the right politician who will work for them. Lalu, Paswan, Nitish Kumar, Mayawati do not seem to have any such plans.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 21, 2009 8:46 am

      Dnyanesh,

      Working hard and taking risks are two entirely different and unconnected things. It is the “risk takers” (with other people’s money) who have landed the global economy in the mess in which it is today. The fact that a people are laid back does not mean that they do not work hard. The traditional Indian farmer is a classic case in point.

      //…improving standard of living in Bihar, UP by creating jobs and wealth there so these poor people will go back by choice. Can Bihar, UP citizens choose the right politician who will work for them. Lalu, Paswan, Nitish Kumar, Mayawati do not seem to have any such plans…//

      Maybe the citizens of Bihar and UP do want politicians who will ensure a steady stream of out-migration to the gold-paved streets of Bambaee, Bunglawr etc., aided by a succession of railway ministers from their constituencies assuring an abundance of train connections from every district and tehsil headquarters in the cow-belt to the “madrasi” el dorados. It will also serve to fulfil the nefarious grand plan of Hindi-ising the whole of India.

  22. April 21, 2009 9:12 am

    Nita, a lot many folks seem to think that you’re part of the producers team behind this movie, so instead of multiple comments and responses, let’s consolidate them all:

    1. Will this movie come out in (any other) language? I don’t know.
    2. Is there a screen version with subtitles in (any other) language? I don’t know.
    3. Is there a DVD version with subtitles in (any other) language? I don’t know.
    4. Oh, if there’s no DVD, when will the DVD be released? I don’t know.
    5. Will the to-be-released DVD have subtitles in (any other) language? I don’t know.
    6. Is the movie being screened in my town/state of (other than Maharashtra)? I don’t know.
    7. No? Why is the movie not being screened in my town/state? I don’t know.
    8. Do you know where the movie is running in my town/state? No.
    9. Do you know how long the movie is going to run in my town/state? No..
    10. The movie has stopped screening in my town/state. Do you know why? No

    There. I saved 10 comments for you to respond to! :-D

    Mahendra, I have filled in the blanks. All in italics! :D – Nita.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 21, 2009 1:24 pm

      Nita, Mahendra:

      While you are at it, here’s Q.11:

      WHY DO YOU NOT KNOW?
      :-) :-) :-)

  23. April 21, 2009 10:17 am

    @ Vivek K

    \\ to the gold-paved streets of Bambaee \\

    You say it even when, then the “gold” is restricted to the “outsiders” who have created and are having it…
    Why do you take pride in the wealth of the very people which you term as “outsider” ?

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 21, 2009 3:54 pm

      V Mittal:

      I have never used the word “outsider” in the particular nuanced sense you suggest. On the contrary, I have gone on record (it is somewhere on the North-South post) to say that all are welcome to go whereever they wish in India to improve their lives, BUT — and this applies in particular to the Hindi imperialist North Indian people who imagine that all of India is their jagir — they MUST learn the local language of the place they choose to go to, MUST NOT criticise any aspect of the local culture until they have themselves imbibed at least some of it and, above all, MUST cease and desist from even thinking to so much as even hint that Hindi is anything other than a MERE ONE of the several languages that make up one of the richest civilisations of the world..

      Coming to //…the “gold” is restricted to the “outsiders” who have created and are having it…//, regurgitation ad nauseam cannot change patent bullshit into truth.

  24. April 21, 2009 10:19 am

    PS: “then” and “when” are swapped in above comment

  25. April 21, 2009 1:13 pm

    gr8 post Nita,

    Even i liked the movie…Mahesh Manjrekar looks good in ‘Raje’ get up. and i like the fact that they have not criticized ‘outsiders’.

    btw : Do you believe that Shivaji Maharaj is great personality?

    It dint feel good to read just ‘Shivaji’
    My own view…just thought to convey it to you.

    Archana

    Archana, thanks. About the title, well, certainly I believe that he is a great personality but I didn’t feel it was necessary to address him by his full title everytime one refers to him. I did it the first time I mentioned his name. Generally this is done in most articles and I give an example here. I simply followed what is often done, even while referring to Mahatma Gandhi. I do apologixe if it offended you. – Nita

  26. April 22, 2009 2:26 am

    निता, महेंद्र, विवेक, ई:
    डोंबिवली फास्ट अावर्जुन पहा :)

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 22, 2009 4:21 am

      Priyank:

      hA chitrapaT najares ANalyAbaddal AbhAr. sandhi miLAlyAs avashya pAhIn.

      jAtA-jAtA lakshAt Ale mhaNUn vichArato, ‘nItA’ madhye ‘I’ dIrgha nako kA? ANi ‘ityAdi’ madhye hrasva?

      malA sangaNakAvar nAgarI Tankalekhan jamat nAhI, mhaNUn ‘iTrans’ sArkhA obaD-dhobaD paryAy vAparat Ahe. kshamasva.

      • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
        April 22, 2009 4:23 am

        Priyank:

        tA. ka.: ‘AvarJUn’ madhalA ‘JU’ dIrgha havA.

        • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
          April 22, 2009 4:28 am

          dusarA tA. ka.:

          mAjhyA mUL tippaNIt don-tIn ThikANI ‘Ja’ chyA aivajI ‘ja’ paDalA Ahe to sudhArUn gheNe: ‘naJares’ ANi ‘JAtA-JAtA’ ase have.

          • April 22, 2009 9:37 am

            विवेक,
            तुमची ‘iTrans’ लिपी वाचायला सोपी नाहीये, पण माझ्या (ईंग्रजी माध्यमात शिकलेल्या) मराठीतल्या चुका दृष्टीस अाणल्याबद्दल धन्यवाद. ‘निता’ वगळता सर्व मान्य (कारण ईंग्रजीत ती neeta असं लिहीत नाही, असो).

            १०वी च्या परिक्षेनंतर मराठी लिहायाची कधीच गरज पडत नाही ही अत्यंत लाजीर्वाणी गोष्ट अाहे. हो ना?

            • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
              April 22, 2009 11:11 am

              Priyank:

              My fairly elaborate response to you in Marathi (iTrans) got wiped off the screen before I could click “submit”, and I am too busy right now to labour on it again. In any case, a large part of what I have to say would be off-topic. Maybe we can continue this dialogue by e-mail.

              Just one comment on your interpretation of the ‘i’ in ‘Nita’ as hrasva. In the routine English transcription of tatsama words, ‘i’ and ‘u’ often serve equally for the hrasva and the deergha forms, though some people do, it is true, draw the distinction by using ‘ee’ and ‘oo’ for the deergha. But this can amount to splitting hairs, especially in the case of Marathi and Gujarati, where the distinction in any case has largely vanished from speech.

              The thing that bothers me much more is the way Indians educated in the English medium are insensitive to the terminal ‘a’ (standing for the first among the Devanagari vowels), not realising that it is an inherent vowelic ending, to be pronounced like the initial ‘a’ in ‘apart’ or ‘along’ (although the modern tendency, except among very fussy people, is to treat it as a halanta or pure consonantal ending.

              It makes my blood boil to hear Indians pronouncing {now I switch to iTrans} ‘yoga’ as ‘yogA’, or ‘rAmAyaNa’ as ‘ramAynA’, which are such culturally illiterate and pretentiously anglicised forms. The halanta (e.g. ‘yog'; ‘rAmAyaN) is more acceptable because it is at least of indigenous provenance {iTrans ends}.

              For more on halanta see http [colon] [double-slash] www [dot] danam [dot] co [dot] uk [slash] Sanskrit [slash] Sanskrit%20Introductory [slash] 07%20Lesson.pdf

              • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
                April 22, 2009 11:14 am

                Please forgive the unintended continuous italicisation of nearly two paragraphs above. I seem to have messed up somewhere with the command.

                • rags permalink
                  April 22, 2009 2:09 pm

                  I don’t think they do it to sound anglicised. More because of ignorance.

                • April 22, 2009 10:47 pm

                  Vivek,

                  I certainly know what you mean. At a place where I teach Sitar, some naive guy, out of sheer respect, wrote my name as ‘Priyanka’.

                  In 8th standard, I remember a long argument with my history teacher for her pronunciations – रिग्वेदा, यजुर्वेदा, and people (तत्या टोप) and other Marathi names from history books.

                  There needs to be a project for standardization of Marathi in Roman script. Why just Marathi, most Indian languages need it.

                  • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
                    April 23, 2009 7:38 am

                    Priyank,

                    Arguments with history teacher. Hmmm. That brings back memories of my school days when in the equivalent of today’s 6th standard, I wrote an essay for a class assignment on Shivaji, in which I mentioned things which were not in the textbook, and refuted some things that were (our textbook then was a relic of the Raj, which bore the title “Hindu Heroes and Heroines” — ["Hindu" in the old British sense of "Indian"; but the the book did not spell it as "Hindoo" :-)].

                    The teacher, a very gentle lady called Mrs. Srivastava, gave me a decent (though not outstanding) grade, and asked me to see her in the staff common room. There she told me that my essay was excellent and deserved a higher grade, but at my stage of education I must confine myself to things as they were in the textbook and taught in class.

                  • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
                    April 23, 2009 7:45 am

                    Priyank,

                    There’s really no need for a project. Some two or three schemes of standardisation of Marathi in roman script already exist. The trouble is they all use diacritical marks — something we Indians are not comfortable with because our orientation to that script is primarily through English, which does not use diacritics other than in straight borrowings from languages which do; and even these fall into disuse once those words get naturalised.

    • April 22, 2009 11:11 am

      Mahendra, I found that link a couple of days ago but oddly the one I have is this one:
      http://wogma.com/index.php/about-us/reviews-all/417-me-shivaji-raje-bhosale-boltoy

      • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
        April 22, 2009 11:27 am

        Mahendra/Nita,

        Isn’t it strange that when Maharashtrians (or any other “Madrasis”, but Maharashtrians in particular because the El Dorado alias nation’s loo of Mumbai is at stake) seek to assert their cultural identity, they are branded as “jingoistic”, “parochial”, “regional”, “anti-national” etc., whereas the jingoism of the Hindi imperialist North Indians is glorified as “nationalism”, “patriotism”?

        • April 22, 2009 11:48 am

          If you are referring to Meetu’s review, well, I didn’t mind her calling this movie jingoistic, because it is. But some other Hindi movies are jingoistic too but right now I can’t remember which. I don’t think a movie being jingoistic is bad in itself so why be touchy about it? For this subject I think it was needed. Some movies are subtle and some or not. Overall Indian cinema, of whichever language, is not subtle.

          • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
            April 22, 2009 12:16 pm

            Nita,

            No, I did not mean the review. I did not even see it. I was referring to the term %20Jingoistic%20splendor which appears in the URL provided by Mahendra.

        • Naveen permalink
          April 22, 2009 12:28 pm

          What do you mean by ‘Madrasis’? – when Madras presidency dissolved in 1947, Madras state disintegrated four decades ago and Madras city is now Chennai city.

          • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
            April 22, 2009 2:50 pm

            Naveen,

            I assume you are a relative newcomer to this blog. The term “madrasi”, when I use it in quotation marks, refers to everyone in India who is not a Hindi-or-one-of-its-two-major-cognate-languages-speaking North Indian. This is an extended meaning I have assigned to the term, which, without quotation marks, the Hindi imperialist North Indian use collectively for the major Dravidian languages Tamizh, Telugu, Malayalam and Kannada (they usually have not heard of Tulu, Kodava-tak, Kurukh, Kolami, Gondi etc.) and their speakers.

            • Naveen permalink
              April 22, 2009 8:18 pm

              Vivek,

              You say it is North Indians but I’ve seen this tendency to say ‘Madrasis’ mostly in people from Mumbai and Gujarat. I believe it is a resistance in recognizing the distinct culture and language of the four southern states. I personally don’t think it is derogatory but I see no logic in it. To me, its like calling people in North Karnataka – ‘Bombaiyyas’ – which makes no sense today.

  27. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 22, 2009 1:14 pm

    Dear Vivek,
    All the major Indian scripts have derived from the Brahmi script where a consonant is depicted as a conjunct with a vowel. That inherent vowel is understood to be ‘a’ but has changed its sound in the various languages. While in Hindi-Marathi-Gujarati-Punjabi it ‘a’, it is ‘O’ ( the sound of o in God ), and in practically all the South Indian languages it is almost aa ( the sound of a in last ). So it is OK to pronounce Yoga – Yogaa – Yog !

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 22, 2009 2:13 pm

      Dr. Dhruv,

      Yes, it is OK if the basis of such pronunciation is the one you have cited. My comment clearly does not refer to that category.

  28. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 22, 2009 1:58 pm

    //they MUST learn the local language of the place they choose to go to//
    This MUST is hardly ever needed – a majority of such migrants(pity we have to use this word for an Indian going to other place in India) do manage to learn the local language for day-to-day work. And there should not be any MUST. Such feelings did not exist in the long history of India prior to the creation of states on the basis of Language. In the bilingual state of Bombay for example, Gujaratis settled in Mumbai in large numbers. There are several localities that exist even today where practically all residents are gujarati speaking. So many of them, particularly the house-wives & home-aids may never come in contact with people speaking any other language – let alone Marathi. Why should they be compelled to learn Marathi? I grew up in Mumbai – studied in Gujarati medium – stayed in a predominantly Gujarati speaking area – and till I entered college had practically no occasion to interact with any Marathi speaking individual. That is the setting in which most people like me grow. However, while dealing with Marathi friends in the college, the language came to me slowly – there was no hurdle. Now that I have settled in an interior part of Maharashtra, Marathi has become practically my first language. That surely happens to most. It is only in Mumbai & very large cities with cosmopolian life that the situation is different. I feel that in no way means disrespect to Marathi language. And this applies to all the state languages.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 22, 2009 2:11 pm

      Dr. Dhruv,

      Please see my parenthethic expression immediately preceding the one you have quoted.

      • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
        April 22, 2009 2:24 pm

        To further clarify on the above, let us take the example of the Gujaratis that you mention. They don’t venture forth in their public life arrogantly demanding that the people of their places of adoption learn Gujarati. It is they who voluntarily learn Marathi, or Bangla, or Tamizh, or Kannada, as the case may be.

        Contrary to this, the Hindi Imperialist North Indian not only do not learn the language of the place upon which they descend, they insist on the locals speaking with them in Hindi. And of course in Gujarat and Maharashtra the locals go one boot-licking step further by speaking even among themselves in Hindi: hamereku chalenga!

    • rags permalink
      April 22, 2009 2:12 pm

      “This MUST is hardly ever needed – a majority of such migrants(pity we have to use this word for an Indian going to other place in India) do manage to learn the local language for day-to-day work. And there should not be any MUST. Such feelings did not exist in the long history of India ”

      Really? So why aren’t Hindi speakers extending the same courtesy to non-Hindi speakers?

  29. April 22, 2009 3:03 pm

    Nita:

    I see this thread rapidly becoming another Hindi-versus-non-Hindi diatribe :-)

    Vivek:

    I am afraid if you keep referring to Hindi speakers as ‘North Indian bastards’, I may not only have to withdraw ‘Against Method’ but also stop interacting with you.

    I am a Hindi-speaking North Indian who has lived in many cities in India and experienced prejudices of various kind because of my gender, my North Indian status and my colour (fair is fair game for all manner of discrimination in India, positive and otherwise). No, I do not want to be told I am an exception so you will deign not to direct the abuses towards me or my ilk.

    I have great regard for your age but once in a while, I want to be convinced that the regard is well-earned. Thanks.

    Please feel free to respond in your usual caustic manner, if you wish but this is Nita’s forum and I think we have no right to soil the tone of the discussion. Thanks.

    Shefaly, because he used the asterisks the comment with the b word escaped my moderation filter, while yours didn’t. I think I will have to edit his comment but will let yours be. I think that should be enough for others to know the word used. – Nita.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 22, 2009 7:20 pm

      Nita, Shefaly:

      Please note that I have never used the term “North Indian ********”. It has always been the unbroken string “Hindi imperialist North Indian ********” or simply “Hindi imperialist ********”. And Nita has almost always edited out the offensive word, so let me first of all exculpate her.

      Shefaly,

      As one of the thimbleful of your “ilk” (to use your word) who knows Marathi, Bangla and probably a few other MILs of the non-North, learnt from your living environment without resistance and with a commendable absence of arrogance, you must know that my expletive, directed at an overwhelming majority of native Hindi speakers spread all over India, does not extend to you. If, despite this, you feel personally offended, I extend an unconditional apology.

      Having said that, let me hasten to assure you that by thus apologising I do not seek to establish a quid pro quo requesting the withdrawal of your ultimatums (or should that be “ultimata”?). That is entirely your prerogative. I will respect whatever you decide, and it will not in the least bit affect my esteem for you.

  30. Dnyanesh permalink
    April 22, 2009 4:30 pm

    I read Meetu’s review of this movie. This is what an outsider feels about this movie. You can feel this ‘problem’ when you become Maharashtrian in true sense. It means when you take a pride in being Maharashtrian. Will an outsider (or his next generation) have same respect for Marathi, Shivaji, Vithoba, Khandoba, Tulja Bhavani, Dnyaneshwar, Tukaram, Sawarkar, Ambedkar, Phule, Mangeshkar. I am from Pune and I hate to hear Hindi on the streets. I respect Hindi but not at the cost of my mother tongue, not at any cost!

  31. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 22, 2009 4:46 pm

    I find here that a vast majority of the North Indians who are settled here have picked up Marathi – and their children take education in Marathi or English. Marathi in fact is becoming the language of conversation even at home amongst them. As I remarked earlier – that is a natural process. The North Indian Kayasthas slowly migrated to Maharashtra and down the centuries became Maharashtrians. The Thakares are one of them! Gujaratis settled here for more than 3 centuries have ceased to be Gujaratis for all practical purposes. These processes are natural and it would be prudent to let things go on that way. MUST becomes a roadblock in fact as it arouses reaction to that. Besides, we as Indians should also worry about our less fortunate brethern who have no state to claim as their ‘own’. Kachchhis have been forced to learn in Gujarati. And what about Sindhis? Why should any state language be imposed on them? These are points that must be taken into account.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 22, 2009 5:40 pm

      Nishithbhai:

      //Kachchhis have been forced to learn in Gujarati. And what about Sindhis? Why should any state language be imposed on them? These are points that must be taken into account.//

      I wholeheartedly agree with these sentiments. Kachchhis, even in their home territory of Kachchh, find their language relegated to second-class status. But at the same time they have economic clout that extends far beyond Kachchh, Gujarat and even India, together with strong social cohesion — factors which help to keep their language and culture alive and reinforce their distinctive identity, as an interface culture between Sindhi and Gujarati. Their numerous social and cultural institutions, handsomely endowed, further strengthen this assertion of identity, and they can do it without being offensive.

      The Sindhis are a somewhat different story. Although some of them are economically very powrful, there are large numbers who are not. Also, as a community that suffered the trauma of partition head on, and were forced out of their homeland as refugees, they were dispersed across different parts of Western India, where many of them started from scratch to rebuild their fortunes.

      Yet neither the Kachchhis nor the Sindhis found it necessary to clamour for their languages to be forced down the throats of people in the regions where they have settled and flourished.

      In contrast to this you have people from UP and Bihar who have aggressively and rudely sought to browbeat the locals and their cultural identity where they have settled. The most blatant example of this was the move by some bhaiya hoodlum corporators a year or so ago to make Hindi the official language of the Brihanmumbai Mahanagarpalika, seeking to oust Marathi. By that logic the Gujaratis (who have been in Mumbai much longer and have a more genuine claim to making it a prosperous place), the Tamils, the Kannadigas and the Malayalis who also have a significant presence, could and should have made similar claims. They did not, and they have no problems with speaking Marathi as well as their own languages in their traditional strongholds such as Ghatkopar, Kalbadevi and Matunga.

      //…a vast majority of the North Indians who are settled here have picked up Marathi…Marathi in fact is becoming the language of conversation even at home amongst them.//

      It would be nice if you could cite some statistics to support this statement. I have come across very few who actually speak Marathi.

      Your statement about the Kayasthas (the Chandraseniya Kayastha Prabhus or CKPs as they are known in Maharashtra) describes a process that happened over several centuries, and they have made great contributions to the formation and enrichment of Maharashtra and its culture; they did not seek to impose their imported culture on the land of their adoption.

      The Great Trinity of the CKPs — Baji Prabhu Deshpande, Ram Ganesh Gadkari and Chintaman Dwarkanath Deshmukh — made contributions that will always be remembered by Maharashtrians with gratitude (even though Deshmukh attracted criticism in Delhi as being parochial to regional over “national” interests).

      Even Bal Thackeray’s father, Prabodhankar Keshav Sitaram Thackeray, in his own right (contrary to the mischievous slur-campaign by a body of johnnies-come-lately to Mumbai that his statue in the city was installed just because he was Bal Thackeray’s father) was a progressive social activist and writer who campaigned against caste biases and played a key role in the formation of Maharashtra state (which the Centre delayed for nearly five years after the rest of India had been reorganised into language-based states).

      Please note that in stating the above I have no special personal interest in the CKPs, am not one myself, nor do I endorse the ever-changing ideology or the street-politics of the Shiv Sena or its offshoot the MNS. It is only in response to your bringing up the Kayasthas and the Thackerays (as they spell their surname) that I thought I would fill in these scanty details.

      Thank you for your patience.

  32. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 22, 2009 4:52 pm

    //It makes my blood boil to hear Indians pronouncing {now I switch to iTrans} ‘yoga’ as ‘yogA’, or ‘rAmAyaNa’ as ‘ramAynA’, which are such culturally illiterate and pretentiously anglicised forms. The halanta (e.g. ‘yog’; ‘rAmAyaN) is more acceptable because it is at least of indigenous provenance {iTrans ends}.//
    It was to this comment that I responded earlier. yogA need not be considered anglicised – it is perfectly South Indian!

  33. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 22, 2009 5:03 pm

    //Will an outsider (or his next generation) have same respect for Marathi, Shivaji, Vithoba, Khandoba, Tulja Bhavani, Dnyaneshwar, Tukaram, Sawarkar, Ambedkar, Phule, Mangeshkar. I am from Pune and I hate to hear Hindi on the streets. I respect Hindi but not at the cost of my mother tongue, not at any cost!//
    Do all Marathis have respect for the list mentioned? And why confine them to Maharashtra? Are they not our national treasure? And who really tells anyone to respect Hindi at the cost of his/her mother-tongue? But one thing is sure – A language grows and prospers by the speakers of that language nourishing it, using it – not by forcing that language on the non-native speakers. And that applies to Hindi in equal measure – I have stated in an earlier topic that it would be better to do away with compulsory teaching of Hindi from our schools. What applies to the country as a whole applies equally to the linguistic states as well.

  34. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 22, 2009 6:59 pm

    //But at the same time they have economic clout that extends far beyond Kachchh, Gujarat and even India, together with strong social cohesion — factors which help to keep their language and culture alive and reinforce their distinctive identity, as an interface culture between Sindhi and Gujarati. Their numerous social and cultural institutions, handsomely endowed, further strengthen this assertion of identity, and they can do it without being offensive.//
    Vivekbhai, the new generation is fast losing their mother-tongue. I have several Kachchhi friends who are facing this problem. Gujarati is imposed on them as it is the state language of Gujarat. And as they are settled all over – they are forced by circumstances to take education in the respective state languages or in English. Same is the case with Sindhis.
    My comments about North Indians switching over to Marathi is based on what I see around me here in Roha – I am unable to produce any statistics.
    //Your statement about the Kayasthas (the Chandraseniya Kayastha Prabhus or CKPs as they are known in Maharashtra) describes a process that happened over several centuries, and they have made great contributions to the formation and enrichment of Maharashtra and its culture; they did not seek to impose their imported culture on the land of their adoption.//
    That is exactly what I want to convey. If they didn’t impose their culture on the land of their adoption, nobody forced them to accept Marathi – it happened naturally.
    My best friend here in Roha is a CKP & hence I know all these details.
    About Hindi I would like to say that it ( or its precursors) has served as a language of communication amongst the masses over a vast territory of India for several centuries now. How it was so – I don’t know. But that fact cannot be denied. Sant Namdeo new Hindi of those times and his verses find a place even in the Grantha-saheb of the Sikhs. Even Shivaji Maharaj knew Hindi. Maharashtra has a very old tradition of classical music and almost all the basic raags have been taught using Hindi verses from very old times – & that holds true even in West Bengal. Hence a vernacular form of Hindi was widely spoken & understood. So when the Hindi-speaking people came in these areas it was natural for all to use Hindi as a language of communication. I would not say it was imposed.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 22, 2009 8:03 pm

      Nishithbhai,

      Not only Namdeo (whose contributions to the Guru Granth are well known) but also Tukaram has Hindi compositions to his credit.

      Even in the deep south, of the great Carnatic music composers, Swathi Tirunal composed Hindi krithis, and so (I think) did either Shyama Sastri or Muthuswami Dikshitar. So you are right to the extent that there has historically been a linguistic flow, but it has been in one direction.

      The northerners have always resisted the languages of the non-north, even when they went into the non-north. And starting from the latter half of the 19th century, the likes of Bharatendu Harishchandra, Madan Mohan Malaviya, Purushottam Das Tandon, Seth Govind Das, and several other litterateurs as well as politicians embarked upon the grand design of bulldozing the whole of India with Hindi.

      There is no organic continuity between this grand design and the preceding natural diffusion of Hindi (which includes the intance of classical music compositions that you mention — incidentally, these are mainly in the rich old literary forms of Hindi such as Braj and Avadhi, now reduced even in their home territory to the status of mere “dialects”).

      The grand design of Harishchandra, Malaviya et al was a purely political project to impose the hegemony of the north on the whole of India.

      I could go on and on, with citations, dates etc., but will rest my case here.

  35. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 22, 2009 10:47 pm

    Dear Vivekbhai,
    There indeed was a desire by the people mentioned by you to make Hindi the sole national language – whatever may be the intention. Fortunately we had better minds – Pandit Nehru being the most sensible amongst them – who prevented such a state of affairs. But I would not like to blame all the Hindi-speaking people for that. Besides, the natural flow of a language becoming the chief medium of communication within a multilingual society usually proceeds in one direction. What I wanted to suggest is this : prior to reorganisation of states along linguistic lines we never faced such problems. And the reorganisation was meant for the growth of all our Indian languages. The idea of India includes the right of a person to study in his mother-tongue and no language can be imposed on anyone. So just as Hindi cannot be & must not be imposed on anyone – in like manner a state language cannot be & must not be imposed on any one staying in that state. It is my right to display the name of my nursing home in my mother-tongue, it is my duty to display it in the script and language understood by the majority of people staying in the area where my nursing home is situated. It is the latter half that makes sense and mature people would do that as a routine. The moment an issue is made, reactions spring up. It then stretches to the extent of people being forced to change the names of their shops : In Mumbai, they had to change their names from Karanchiwalla! Sindhis who were forced out of their homelands nevertheless would carry fond memories with them and pass it to their futue generations. How can we prevent them from doing that in the name of hurting the sentiments of the people of the land which they have been forced by fate to adopt? That is the only reason I am against the idea of this ‘MUST learn local language’. As I have said earlier, people learn local languages for purely practical reasons anyway.

  36. Dnyanesh permalink
    April 23, 2009 12:08 am

    NN Dhruv: I am not sure if you know this. Pandit Nehru once referred to Shivaji Maharaj as Lutaroo, CBSE schools gives very little attention to this national hero in its syllabus, very small as compared to Mughals. Shivaji’s kingdom was the only Hindu kingdom since Aluddeen Khilaji defeated Ramdeo rai at Daulatabaad. This clearly shows how this tallest national hero is treated. Non-natives were never forced to learn Marathi in Maharashtra but now because of this mass migration Marathi’s have started speaking in Hindi to keep communication smooth. Stubborn Hindi belt people migrating here do not want to learn our language. If UP, Bihari leaders want to send their people they better start Marathi in their schools:) I hate to see my old mother struggling to speak in Hindi. I don’t think she should learn Hindi.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 23, 2009 6:43 am

      Dear Nishithbhai,

      I think the basic difference between us is that you speak the language of idealistic reason, I am talking about harsh ground truths. You believe in offering the other cheek, I believe in bloodying noses. I would not like to repeat the several things that I have been saying over close to two years on this blog, but if you care to look, you will find that each and every issue that you have raised has been addressed, mainly on the N. vs. S. thread, starting sometime in June or July 2007.

      Hindi has been imposed except in Tamil Nadu, where there was considerable resistance.

      In most cases, the result has been that in order to make way for Hindi in the school system, the learning of the local language has been sacrificed. This is particularly true in boot-licking Maharashtra and Gujarat, where the quality of local language spoken by the locals has perceptibly gone down within our own lifetimes, while the cancerous spread of Hindi threatens to kill off whatever remains.

      In an effort to redress the imbalance created by the mandatory introduction of Hindi in the school system, the Three-Language Formula was introduced in 1968, which required the teaching of the local language, Hindi and English. In those states where the local language was Hindi, this formula required, explicitly, the teaching of “a Modern Indian Language — preferably from the South”. The non-North Indian states complied with this requirement; the north, particularly UP, systematically made mockery of it, introducing, instead, Sanskrit (which is not a Modern Indian Language.

      All these wrongs MUST be righted. And this MUST be done with insult, humiliation and if necessary violence.

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 23, 2009 7:23 am

      Dnyanesh,

      I have often heard this allegation against Pandit Nehru that you mention, but have never been able to locate when, where and in what context He said it. If you have read his Discovery of India or other writings on history, he has in fact some very adulatory things to say about Shivaji.

      Let me state (with only a very small degree of exaggeration) that in the entire struggle against the British and in the first 18 years after independence, Nehru was the ONLY North Indian political leader who had a genuine appreciation of India’s cultural plurality and diversity, which went far beyond political expediency. The rest — all honourable men — were just opportunistic constituency-builders and office-seekers.

      Regarding your comment on how the school history books treat Shivaji, wouldn’t you agree that, in both time and space, the Mughal impact on India, for better or for worse, was far greater and sustained than that of Shivaji? If there is a lacuna in the CBSE textbooks, what is stopping the Maharashtra Board from correcting it?

      Finally, please note that the correct names of the dramatis personae at Devagiri/Deogir (or Daulatabad if you prefer) were Ala-ud-din Khalji (or Khilji) and Ramachandra Yadav (alternatively Ramdevrao Yadav), not “Aluddeen Khilaji” and “Ramdeo rai.” Incidentally, I suppose you know that after defeating Ramdev Yadav, Ala-ud-din reinstated him as a feudatory and used Deogir as a base from which to attack the Kakatiya kingdom of Warangal.

  37. Dnyanesh permalink
    April 23, 2009 11:07 am

    Vivek: With due respect to the first PM for supporting democracy and secularism in India, I would like to give some lines that I found on HNN (by Vaishnavi C. Sekhar, in the Times of London (March 22, 2004). These lines no longer exist in Discovery of India.
    ————–
    Chapter 91 of this book describes the rise of nationalistic, ethnic groups like the Sikhs and Marathas and how they broke theMughal empire. In the first edition of the book, published in 1934, Nehru praises Shivaji as a “gallant” and “brilliant” captain who became the “glory of the Marathas and the terror of the Empire” but also calls him an “adventurer” and suggests that his killing of Bijapur general Afzal Khan was not entirely honourable.

    The paras run thus: ‘With his enemies he was prepared to adopt any means, good or bad, provided that he gained his end. He killed a general sent against him by Bijapur by treachery..Some of Shivaji’s deeds, like the treacherous killing of the Bijapur general, lower him greatly in our estimation. But it seems that in all his warfare he was careful to avoid attack or injury to the common people, to women, to mosques and the like.’

    Historians say these remarks were strongly protested shortly after the book was published, and probably deleted in the revised edition of 1939. Says A Jamkhedkar, well-known historian, “Nehru, unfortunately, relied largely on historian Jadunath Sarkar’s book on Shivaji, which was more dependent on Persian sources.” He suggests that more than any derogatory remark, what people found objectionable was his view of Shivaji as a feudal lord rather than a freedom-fighter.However, he adds,when Sarkar revised his opinion of Shivaji, so did Nehru.
    ————————-
    Do you agree that killing of Afzal Khan was not entirely honourable? Do you know that Shivaji had an elder brother who was killed by the same people?

    Regarding NCERT books (sorry, not CBSE) I read it in http://www1.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Cities/Pune/Protest-over-NCERT-books/articleshow/4258151.cms
    Now, other than Akbar, which other Mughal emperor was closer to India? I think Aurangzeb was worst of all. Was he stronger than Akbar? I agree it is part of our history and can not and should not be removed but Shivaji’s role is not less important. He fought against the strongest ruler and founded ‘Swarajya’ i.e. our own state. He had respect for all religions and treated all citizens well. The best example is ‘Kalyanchya subhedarachi soon’. Do you think this was possible in Afzal Khan, Adil Shah, Aurangzeb areas?

  38. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 23, 2009 11:16 am

    Dnyanesh,
    Vivekbhai has answered what I wanted to convey. Please read Nehru’s Discovery of India – he has praised Shivaji Maharaj there. You may not be aware, but people in Gujarat – especially in Surat which was looted by Maharaj – carry this memory of him. There are stories describing the harassment of locals and womenfolk by the army of Maharaj. Vinobaji has very rightly said it is better not to teach history! It creates prejudices in the minds of generations after generations. Fortunately, text-books in Gujarat have not dealt with this part of the history. Shivaji Maharaj is therefore a hero there as he is here in Maharashtra. I fully agree with you that your mother doesn’t need to learn Hindi – even if you settle in a Hindi speaking state and she has to come and live with you there. Human nature is such that when there is a need to communicate, people manage to find ingenuous means regardless of the language. No language should ever be imposed on any-one. One doesn’t disrespect the local culture just because he doesn’t learn the local language. And one canot be considered to be respecting the local culture by learning the local language. But for purely practical reasons, most people manage to learn the local language anyway. And at least here in Roha, I find North Indians no exception to this rule. It is in fact mostly the Bengalis and the Malayalam-speaking people here – who have not picked up the local language well. However, their children are of course conversant in Marathi. In fact, they are hardly able to read or write their own languages!
    Vivekbhai, I have already stated during a debate on another topic last year, that anomalies must be corrected and the 3-language formula has ceased to have any use. I agree that my approach is different from yours. It is my belief that we should not hold a whole generation responsible for the errors of their forefathers. Hatred will only beget hatred.

  39. rags permalink
    April 23, 2009 11:48 am

    A very interesting discussion. :) I like the way it’s going…. I’d like to address a couple of points…

    “Even in the deep south, of the great Carnatic music composers, Swathi Tirunal composed Hindi krithis, and so (I think) did either Shyama Sastri or Muthuswami Dikshitar.”
    Wow! I didn’t know this.. Their compostions are mostly in Telugu..

    “CBSE schools gives very little attention to this national hero in its syllabus, very small as compared to Mughals.”
    Not only that, NCERT books have minimum information on South India and almost nothing on the NorthEast. I don’t remember clearly but I think there was only a small mention on Ahom rulers. No wonder people know zilch about the history of Northeast even today.

    “With his enemies he was prepared to adopt any means, good or bad, provided that he gained his end. He killed a general sent against him by Bijapur by treachery..Some of Shivaji’s deeds, like the treacherous killing of the Bijapur general, lower him greatly in our estimation.”
    I think this is the truth but this should not lower the regard we have for Shivaji. Most rulers employed treacherous means to win and I’d commend Shivaji for using it. I don’t think any Indian ruler could have survived without such tactics (the Mughals, Mongols and every other warring groups have used it).

    “Hindi has been imposed except in Tamil Nadu, where there was considerable resistance.”
    You know, I think in the long run non-acceptance of Hindi and the anti-hindi agitations have done more damage to Tamilnadu than good. There are very few CBSE schools here and only they (and a few other matric schools) teach Hindi, so very few people actually know Hindi. Most of the people grew up without Hindi and they have a tough time when they migrate to other states….

    • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
      April 23, 2009 2:19 pm

      Rags,

      The Tiruvatrur Trinity did compose most of their kritis in Telugu, and a fair number in Sanskrit too. I had read or heard somewhere that one of them — either Shyama Sastri or Dikshitar — had composed a few in Hindi too. But I cannot authenticate this information from any source. (In fact while researching this, I found that of the 479 kriti’s unambiguously attributed to Dikshitar, only one is in Telugu! Of the rest, 475 are in Sanskrit and three in Manipravala).

      So that leaves only Swathi Tirunal (1813-1846). An amazing man. Maharaja of Travancore. A maestro and a patron of both Carnatic and Hindustani music. He was fluent in Malayalam, Sanskrit, Kannada, Telugu, Tamizh, Marathi, Bangla, Oriya and English! In the early 19th century!! Wonder how many of those languages he composed in.

      • Vivek Khadpekar permalink
        April 23, 2009 2:20 pm

        Apologies for the typo: Tiruvarur, not Tiruvatrur.

  40. April 23, 2009 11:59 am

    @ rags

    \\Most of the people grew up without Hindi and they have a tough time when they migrate to other states….\\

    Not only Hindi but i have met a person who called himself an “engineer” (diploma holder), but didn’t know a word of English…he studied entirely in Tamil medium and English (even basic english) was not taught there…
    It was a real shocker to find an “educated” person who did’nt know the meaning of even basic english words like “what” and “name”…

    • rags permalink
      April 23, 2009 4:36 pm

      Yeah, that’s because of Karunanidhi’s short sighted policies for the past two or three decades and his over emphasis on Tamil to the detriment of English…. There are students who complete their entire schooling in Tamil ( this happens in govt. schools)and end up not being able to string two sentences in English.. I don’t think people mind missing out on Hindi but yeah, not knowingEnglish is a huge disadvantage in the job market… Hmm… So how is it in other states? Is the medium of instruction English in govt. schools? Or is it in Hindi?

  41. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 23, 2009 11:59 am

    Dnyanesh, if Nehru found some acts of Maharaj not entirely honourable, he is free to hold his opinion, is he not? Should that call forth protests? Why should that be taken as a mark of disrespect to Maharashtra? The person whom we call the father of nation is the object of scorn amongst so many Indians. Are they not allowed to hold their own opinions? Should that be taken as an insult to Gujarat? (It is another matter that it is in Gujarat itself that most of such opinion-holders reside today!) Also, let us not forget that even after almost 8-9 centuries of Muslim rule, a vast majority continued to be Hindus. There are many who have this opinion that Shivaji Maharaj was not a freedom-fighter but a feudal lord. Fact is most people who hold this view or the other have never really studied history earnestly. And I would not blame either of the type – our views are conditioned by the circumstances of our birth, religion etc. But I had the occasion to interact with Babasaheb Purandare when he had come to Roha – and he was very clear : he said Maharaj made many mistakes. But who doesn’t? And a person may be born a hero – but he evolves as he grows. He said we must learn from his mistakes also. Nehru anyways was not a Historian – but he had a vision born out of the study of history. The book Discovery of India was written during his stay in jail. And views of history have undergone several changes as more facts have come to light. Again, as Vinobaji has once remarked, are we to carry the burden of history or to be creators of new History?

  42. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 23, 2009 12:56 pm

    @rags, I agree with almost all your statements. That is indeed a balanced narration.

  43. Dnyanesh permalink
    April 24, 2009 12:35 am

    Yes. Nehru did change and removed this part from his book.
    //”Also, let us not forget that even after almost 8-9 centuries of Muslim rule, a vast majority continued to be Hindus”
    Yes, we were too many to be slaughtered by the Mughals :) People like Shivaji did not really understand this math :))

    We should learn from our history to avoid mistakes made in the past. India is a huge country
    and almost every state has its own history. Local people always have respect for their heroes. Their sentiments must be respected. This is a very delicate balance that must be maintained.

  44. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 24, 2009 7:37 pm

    //We should learn from our history to avoid mistakes made in the past.//
    Yes, that is exactly what Vinobaji meant when he said that we should be creators of new history.
    //Local people always have respect for their heroes. Their sentiments must be respected. This is a very delicate balance that must be maintained.//
    Mr Nathuram Godse is a hero for many people – does that mean nobody should criticise him? Is it OK for them to criticise Gandhiji and hurt the sentiments of those who adore the Mahatma? Mr Balasaheb Thakare is a hero for so many people here. I have memories of Gujarati people staying in Mumbai whose lives were ruined by the agitations of Shiv Sena at the behest of Mr Thakare. Is it OK if I cannot speak against him for fear of hurting the sentiments of those who adore him? If we give in to sentiments all the time we’ll cease to have any meaningful democracy. Dnyanesh, please be assured I carry no bitterness for those events and we have progressed way ahead from that point. I am only talking of our democratic rights. And we are fast sliding into times when it is difficult to know in advance as to what action of ours will affect whose sentiments! And it is becoming increasingly difficult to maintain the balance you are talking about.

  45. Dnyanesh permalink
    April 25, 2009 12:57 pm

    Yes, we all should be allowed to speak.
    We must try to understand both sides before forming our opinion. There are millions who still feel that Godse was right even Savarkar was right. What Pakistan could have done in 55 crores? There are lakhs in Maharashtra who feel that Thakrey’s way is wrong but his party’s presence is necessary for Marathi’s people survival in their own state. It was necessary in Mumbai and now because of influx of Biharis it will become necessary in cities like Pune, Nasik. There are reasons behind rise of these people. Hardliners always gain upper hand when ‘central’ parties fail to undestand regional sentiments. It is the responsibility of these central parties to maintain this balance and make sure that people do not go to hardliners. It is their responsibility to make sure that our democratic rights are protected. Unfortunately, we do not have any such central party and I don’t think we will have any.

  46. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 25, 2009 1:40 pm

    //There are millions who still feel that Godse was right even Savarkar was right.//
    Exactly. It is their right to have their opinion and criticise Gandhi – they cannot be stopped from voicing their opinions under the pretext of hurting the sentiments of those who adore Gandhi. In like manner, anyone can have differing opinion about local heroes like say Shivaji Maharaj. ( I hate to consider him as a local hero, he is an idol for the whole nation ).That is how democracy functions.
    // Hardliners always gain upper hand when ‘central’ parties fail to undestand regional sentiments.// So exactly what should the central parties do to understand regional sentiments? That is a point worth considering, isn’t it?

  47. Dnyanesh permalink
    April 25, 2009 4:30 pm

    Yes, people can have any opinion. They can say anything they want in democracy. They can say that Shivaji was wrong when he killed Afzal Khan. Will it stop people, whose dear ones were killed by this gentleman, from admiring Shivaji? NO. But can they understand other opinion? Don’t know.
    Gandhiji is the reason why we are free today. But he was wrong to give 55 crores when it was clear that Pakistan was going to send its army to kill our people. Killing him was not right. Godse was wrong but point he raised was right.

    Central parties need to understand local issues. In our country it is not fair to sack Deshmukh-Patil govt to please Lalu and company. Backwardness, less jobs are issues in Bihar. Mass migration of Biharis putting strain on local infrastructure in Maharashtra. Congress, BJP need to understand both if they are Central parties. They and others need to think about developing backward areas of Bihar, UP. There must be a debate in our parliament on this issue. Sacking Deshmukh-Patil govt in Maharashtra is not going to fix this issue. Ignoring migration issue will certainly give more supporters to MNS in the months to come making it worse.
    And, Yes, Maharashtrians certainly have right to express their opinions in a democratic way

  48. Dr N N Dhruv permalink
    April 25, 2009 7:27 pm

    //Central parties need to understand local issues. In our country it is not fair to sack Deshmukh-Patil govt to please Lalu and company.//
    This is irrefutable. But they were sacked in the wake of terrorist attacks at the behest of an almost hysterical popular outburst created and managed by the media. It was a pity we in Maharashtra lost a good home minister in the process.
    //Backwardness, less jobs are issues in Bihar. Mass migration of Biharis putting strain on local infrastructure in Maharashtra. Congress, BJP need to understand both if they are Central parties. They and others need to think about developing backward areas of Bihar, UP. There must be a debate in our parliament on this issue. Sacking Deshmukh-Patil govt in Maharashtra is not going to fix this issue. Ignoring migration issue will certainly give more supporters to MNS in the months to come making it worse.//
    Again, totally irrefutable.
    //And, Yes, Maharashtrians certainly have right to express their opinions in a democratic way//
    That is obvious. Equally, those like me, whose mother-tongue is not Marathi, who have settled in Maharashtra for almost four generations here, have right to express their opinions in a democratic way. It is another matter that I as an individual have only positive things to say about the original Marathi-speaking people who have accepted me in their midst whole-heartedly. And that is only an example – this is a model that applies to all the states in our country.

  49. April 25, 2009 8:38 pm

    Mr Nathuram Godse is a hero for many people – does that mean nobody should criticise him?

    How many people who criticize Godse have even read his thoughts or his reasons before they venture to criticize him? And do they criticize his action of assassinating Gandhi, or his reasons? Didn’t Indian government ban the book “Nine Hours to Rama” in India? I’m wondering if it’s still banned.

  50. Dr Nishith N Dhruv permalink
    April 28, 2009 12:01 am

    Amit, please read my previous comment //Fact is most people who hold this view or the other have never really studied history earnestly. And I would not blame either of the type – our views are conditioned by the circumstances of our birth, religion etc. // It is the democratic right of an individual to criticise Gandhi just as it is the right of an individual to criticise Godse. That right should not be trampled under the pretext of hurting the sentiments this way or that – and that was the point I wanted to make. I have read Godse’s views and his brother Gopal Godse’s book too. But I agree, all who criticise Godse have not come to conclusions after a balanced study.

    • April 28, 2009 1:26 am

      Nishith, I agree with you regarding criticizing Gandhi or Godse, and my comment wasn’t directed at you personally.

  51. May 8, 2009 6:50 pm

    sounds like an interesting movie but not of my type :)

  52. Satish permalink
    May 19, 2009 3:35 pm

    Marathi movies are towards a greater heights… It can be seen from some of the movies like Shwas, Checkmate, Mee Shivajiraje Bhosale boltoy, etc.

  53. Prathamesh permalink
    July 2, 2009 2:55 pm

    This is a real picture of marathi people. “ME SHIVAJIRAJE BHOSALE BOLTOY” is one of the marathi reality movie. marathi people are ignore this think but this is true. However, marathi people are sold the own plant in mumbai & purchase to longaway plant.

  54. October 7, 2009 11:01 am

    Its one of those well made movie which touches your heart, And sends a message that this is also what we want and how thignt ought to be

  55. Janhavi permalink
    November 1, 2009 9:49 pm

    This entire discussion was interesting. However I cannot understand one point. If India is to function as a country, not just a group of states, there needs to be a common language of communication. What do you suggest it should be? Tamil? Marathi? Surprisingly, a foreign language – English is acceptable to most people as a common medium of communication, rather than an indian language. People are ashamed to acknowledge that they cannot speak very fluent english.
    I live in The Netherlands and inspite of it being such a small country, there are several dialects and similar(well, not really similar) regional conflicts. Yet Dutch is the oficial language. People have a decent knowlegde of English and yet they converse in Dutch. In Germany most people refuse to speak in English.
    I feel ashamed when us Indians think of our languages as something to be learnt after English. Yes for all practical purposes its good to know English but we have made this so important. These European countries are doing very well even without English.
    So when Indians meet in other countries they introduce themselves in English. What is wrong in having Hindi as a common language? Any other language would be more dfficult to implement , I believe.
    Inspite of being a Maharashtrian I believe so. Bollywood is a binding influence because of Hindi. How would it go so far otherwise?

    Jahnavi, if you would like to know why people prefer English and not Hindi as a link language of India you could consider reading this post:

    http://nitawriter.wordpress.com/2006/11/02/the-language-problem

  56. Vijay Mishra permalink
    April 29, 2010 10:42 pm

    I am watching this movie as I am writing.
    A splendid movie !!!
    A movie with a message, this will win atleast a million heart and has the ability to change views of a lot of anti-Maharashtrians like Raj Thakre. I write him as anti-Maharashtrian because his principles will let Maharashtra down.

    I am born and brought up in Mumbai and lived there for 26 years before moving to another City.
    I am proud of Maharashtra and proud to be called as Maharashtrian, though my origin is not from Maharashtra.

    Good review.
    Regards,
    Vijay

  57. Vivek Khadpekar permalink
    April 21, 2009 4:14 pm

    Nita:

    //…the brave king who successfully fought off foreign invaders in his lifetime (1664 – 1680)…//

    Without any disrespect to Shivaji or to the feelings of his admirers (of whom I am one, though I do not subscribe to the cult of his deification that pervades so much of Marathi society), may I humbly point out that by the time of Shivaji’s rise, the “the foreign invaders” had already been in India for nearly 140 years, the sixth-generation ruler of their line was on the throne of Delhi, and unlike their British successors, they had made India their home. They did not think of any other place as home.

    Let us try to be objective about this. They were no longer “foreign”, nor were they “invaders” in the same sense as Babur, the founder of the Mughal empire, had been, or long before him, Mahmud Ghaznavi or Alexander, to name just two.

  58. Vivek Khadpekar permalink
    April 22, 2009 3:34 pm

    Nita,

    As per the poster of the film, of which you have attached a photograph, the correct title of the film is Mee Shivajiraje Bhosale Boltoy. In the title of your post it has become Mee Shivajirao Bhosale Boltoy. Then, through your entire write-up, you have split Shivajirao into Shivaji Rao (is this for the convenience of your North Indian readers who would feel uncomfortable with, and therefore offended by, words of four or five syllables — a typically “madrasi” feature?).

    Then, from independent sources, I learn that the director of the film is Santosh Manjrekar. Mahesh Manjrekar, whom you name as director, has in fact written the script and played a role in the film.

    Thanks for the correction Vivek. It was careless of me and will be more careful next time. Will make the necessary corrections in the post. – Nita.

  59. Vivek Khadpekar permalink
    April 22, 2009 3:41 pm

    Nita,

    Here’s another review of the film which may interest your readers:

    http://movies.indiatimes.com/moviereview/4426058.cms

  60. Esmail Lakdawala permalink
    July 26, 2009 3:46 pm

    Nita,

    Its an amazing read and I really enjoyed it even more after watching the movie. It sensitively deals with all aspects of living in MH and is a non-biased take on the maharashtrian community.

    Way to go!

    Cheers
    Esmail

Trackbacks

  1. Mee Shivajirao Bhosle Boltoy Movie Review

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 429 other followers

%d bloggers like this: